I Peter 2 Metaphysical Bible Interpretation

Metaphysical Bible Interpretation of I Peter Chapter 2

Metaphysically Interpreting I Peter 2:1-10

2:1Putting away therefore all wickedness, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings, 2:2as newborn babes, long for the spiritual milk which is without guile, that ye may grow thereby unto salvation; 2:3if ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious:

2:4unto whom coming, a living stone, rejected indeed of men, but with God elect, precious, 2:5ye also, as living stones, are built up a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. 2:6Because it is contained in scripture,

Behold, I lay in Zion a chief corner stone,
   elect, precious:
And he that believeth on him shall not be put to shame.

2:7For you therefore that believe is the preciousness: but for such as disbelieve,

The stone which the builders rejected,
The same was made the head of the corner;

2:8and,

A stone of stumbling,
   and a rock of offence;

for they stumble at the word, being disobedient: whereunto also they were appointed.

2:9But ye are a elect race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for God's own possession, that ye may show forth the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvellous light:

2:10who in time past were no people,
   but now are the people of God:
who had not obtained mercy,
   but now have obtained mercy.

February 29, 1920: I Peter 2:1-5

2:1Putting away therefore all wickedness, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings, 2:2as newborn babes, long for the spiritual milk which is without guile, that ye may grow thereby unto salvation -- 1. When the true light from Heaven shines into the consciousness, the soul instinctively turns away from all thought of evil, and, as naturally as a newborn babe, demands its milk, asks for the sustenance and support furnished by the appropriation of the pure spiritual substance.

2:3if ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious: -- 2. One of the first signs that the soul has tasted of the true fruits of Spirit is the tendency to affirm the enduring goodness of Spirit. This broadens, deepens, and strengthens the nature, so that shortcomings in others are readily overlooked. Forgiveness, grace, mercy are exercised towards the undeserving; the spirit of magnanimity flows forth, a blessing to all, even seeking the highest possible good of the offender.

2:5ye also, as living stones, are built up a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. -- 3. Each member of the church is a “living stone” in the spiritual house of God. According to the measure that we “live the life,” we are elect and precious in the sight of God. To the extent that we make spiritual sacrifices for humanity’s sake, so, to that degree, we open the way to receive the rich gifts of the kingdom.

Metaphysically Interpreting I Peter 2:11-17

2:11Beloved, I beseech you as sojourners and pilgrims, to abstain from fleshly lust, which war against the soul; 2:12having your behavior seemly among the Gentiles; that, wherein they speak against you as evil-doers, they may by your good works, which they behold, glorify God in the day of visitation.

2:13Be subject to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether to the king, as supreme; 2:14or unto governors, as sent by him for vengeance on evil-doers and for praise to them that do well. 2:15For so is the will of God, that by well-doing ye should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men: 2:16as free, and not using your freedom for a cloak of wickedness, but as bondservants of God. 2:17Honor all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the king.

June 19, 1927: I Peter 2:11-17

Should one who discerns the spiritual law of the supermind follow it and ignore all manmade laws? One who has spiritual understanding avoids doing anything to create opposition. Jesus made himself subject to the law of the land; he paid taxes, and so forth, yet he knew higher law. His kingdom was not of this world, but he respected the temporal rulers and obeyed their laws.

When one is guided by divine will and is obedient to the law of love, will he ever transgress the laws of man? This question is answered in verses 15 and 16: “For so is the will of God, that by well-doing ye should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men: As free, and not using your freedom for a cloak of wickedness, but as bondservants of God.”

What is the true Christ method of overcoming sin? Sin is failure to get the best results out of life. We do not always understand that every desire is primarily good and that, when we fail to get good results from the activities of the senses, it is evident that we are acting without the light of Spirit. We should have the same mind that was in Christ Jesus; if we had it, we should know how to lift up the son of man and bring satisfaction and joy out of what we in our ignorance pronounce sin and sorrow.

February 17, 1935: I Peter 2:11-17

What is temperance? Temperance is moderation in all things. The word is another name for self-control.

Who best keeps the law of love? He that has accepted the Christ standard as the law of his being keeps the law of love as a matter of course.

How are we redeemed from bondage to the things of sense? By calling into action the higher powers of thought man redeems himself from bondage to sense. The process by which redemption is achieved is known as transmutation.

Name an effective method of dealing with sin and disease. A good method is by understanding that man is spiritual and is given power to control himself, mind, soul, and body, under all conditions. Follow this up by forgiving all sin and weakness mentally and denying all condemnation therefor. Finally, affirm the presence and power of Spirit, and deny all fear.

Can the good citizen and the good Christian be determined by any sure tests? The main test of the good citizen is respect for the law and his ability to keep it. The good Christian is characterized by his eagerness relieve distress and his ability to do so, as well as by his keeping a serene, unruffled spirit at all times.

In maintaining a law-abiding citizenship what, if anything, will take the place of the fear of punishment for wrongdoing? The only effectual substitute for the deterrent fear is the incentive of love of what is good and true. Love alone is stronger than fear.

February 19, 1939: I Peter 2:11-12
INTERPRETATION

What kind of living is found to be inconsistent with a spiritually quickened conscience? The selfish, pleasure loving, self-pampering habit of living is not approved by the one whose conscience is awake to spiritual truth.

Explain the meaning of “behavior seemly among the Gentiles?” When man brings religion into the external affairs of everyday life and into all his interests, secular as well as spiritual, his behavior is “seemly among the Gentiles.”

What does this lesson teach by the indirect method? It urges on the mind the importance of self-restraint and self-discipline on overcoming and redirecting the bent of the natural man.

December 13, 1942: I Peter 2:13-17

Is it right to subject ourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord’s sake? It is right for the individual not to waste his energies in futile opposition. He should put them forth where their weight will be felt. When an order is established, the individual only upsets himself by struggling alone to overturn it. He who stands alone should keep himself at peace with others.

What is the divine will where ignorance and foolishness are concerned? The divine will contrasts the negations of ignorance and foolishness with wisdom and sound judgment and through making constructiveness imperative shows the nothingness of all things negative.

How is freedom realized by those who are in worldly bondage? Each individual realizes within himself freedom to obey of his own volition the commands of his worldly superiors freedom to honor others, to love those of like mind with himself; to “fear God” (or understand the inevitability of divine law), and to “honor the king” (or render due respect to those in authority over him).

November 19, 1944: I Peter 2:13-17

Does well-doing invariably “put to silence the ignorance of foolish men”? Not always, because ignorance may prevent the one possessed by it from realizing that it would be best for him to keep silent. “A fool also multiplieth words,” but “the tongue of the righteous is as choice silver” of sterling worth, because their words are true and not too plentiful to be cheap or common. However each one may silence his own ignorance by well-doing and gain wisdom in making a study of this form of expression.

Is freedom a part of the will of God? It is. “So is the will of God ... as free, and not using your freedom for a cloak of wickedness.”

What are “bondservants of God”? Those whose conscience holds them to the right course of conduct. To all intents and purposes these are the freest of freemen, since the bonds are within their own consciences, where bonds of right belong.

August 19, 1951: I Peter 2:13-17

How is conformity to the established law of society considered in the latter part of the text for today? It is considered as the will of God. “Be subject to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake ... As free, and not using your freedom for cloak of wickedness, but as bondservants of God.” Our ultimate allegiance is to Truth, and our sense of responsibility to it binds us to observe the rules of good citizenship.

Metaphysically Interpreting I Peter 2:18-25

2:18Servants, be in subjection to your masters with all fear; not only to the good and gentle, but also to the froward. 2:19For this is acceptable, if for conscience toward God a man endureth griefs, suffering wrongfully. 2:20For what glory is it, if, when ye sin, and are buffeted for it, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye shall take it patiently, this is acceptable with God. 2:21For hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, that ye should follow his steps:

2:22who did no sin,
   neither was guile found in his mouth:

2:23who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously: 2:24who his own self bare our sins in his body upon the tree, that we, having died unto sins, might live unto righteousness; by whose stripes ye were healed. 2:25For ye were going astray like sheep; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls.

February 29, 1920: I Peter 2:19-25

2:19For this is acceptable, if for conscience toward God a man endureth griefs, suffering wrongfully. 2:20For what glory is it, if, when ye sin, and are buffeted for it, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye shall take it patiently, this is acceptable with God. -- 4. Jesus said, “Blessed are ye when men shall reproach you, and persecute you, and say all manner of evil against you falsely for my sake.” This is the supreme test of patience: to suffer wrongly, yet keep free from all thought of revenge; be willing to place all judgment in the law, holding fast the blessed hope of a speedy deliverance from all sorrows and sufferings.

2:21For hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, that ye should follow his steps: 2:22who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth: 2:23who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously: 2:24who his own self bare our sins in his body upon the tree, that we, having died unto sins, might live unto righteousness; by whose stripes ye were healed. -- 5. As the followers of Jesus express this prefect pattern, the standards of Christian living change accordingly. As the soul of man dies unto sin, the resurrecting power of the living Word brings into expression the beauty and perfection of the Christ.

2:25For ye were going astray like sheep; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls. -- 6. Therefore, “faith without works is dead.” It is through wrongly, yet keeping the consciousness free from all guile, that we find the way back to the kingdom, that we are returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of our souls.

March 26 , 1939: I Peter 2:20-25

What is the teaching in verse 20 of chapter 2? This is the same as Jesus' teaching of the “second mile,” namely, that we should be willing to do more than could humanly be asked or expected of us in order to prove our claim to the divine nature. Patience that has its roots in principle does not break, when one bears undeserved suffering.

“For hereunto were ye called.” What is the meaning of such a call? When we choose to follow the Christ, we undertake to prove our allegiance to principle, and this we expect to do by means of tests of various kinds. Spiritual strength is not proved otherwise.

What points are brought out in the last three verses? The principle of nonresistance and the proof that by the manner of His death Jesus gave of the spiritual unity of all men.

May 30, 1943: I Peter 2:11-25

Is faith altogether a matter of inner conviction or does it rightly find expression in externals? It is first of all an inner conviction, but to fulfill its purpose a conviction must be expressed in conduct that involves external circumstances as well as principles.

What does “having your behavior seemly among the Gentiles” mean? It means that we are to be good citizens as well as faithful followers of the Christ. Good judgment, level-headedness, and reasonableness in all things are spiritual qualities, as is also obedience to law and order.

For what reason are “sojourners and pilgrims” requested “to abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul”? First, for the benefit of the individual, who must himself keep his soul at peace through clean living; secondly, for the sake of others, who judge the individual’s faith by his outer expression, and who may be influenced by that expression for either good or evil.

Why should we use our faith in secular matters as well as in matters of religion? Because faith should be used as a mainstay and support in all the affairs of life. Only thus can we make our life a harmonious whole and an expression of the Truth that is in Divine Mind.

What argument against well-doing avails? None. Well-doing is the final answer to all detractors. “That by well-doing ye should put to silence the ignorance of foolish men.”

How can anyone be free and still be a bond servant? He can be free in his own mind, because he acknowledges within his own heart allegiance to the Highest. As a bond servant to another man, he is still answerable in his inner convictions to God, whose requirements include all others, therefore he is freed from a sense of bondage to the lesser master.

Is it right to suffer in silence for well-doing that is misinterpreted or misunderstood? If understanding and a clearing up of the situation seem for the time being out of the question, the sufferer can at least turn his suffering to account constructively by establishing in himself patience and humility. There is a gain to counterbalance any apparent loss.

How can we truly commit ourselves “to him that judgeth righteously”? By faith that divine law is unerringly just and that its occasional failure to become instantaneously manifest in our life and affairs is no proof that it is not at work there, we can commit ourselves to its action unreservedly. The main object of divine law in the destiny of the race is the building of character that will withstand every test and strain, and this is a timeless undertaking.

Transcribed by Lloyd Kinder on 12-23-2013