Exodus 35 Metaphysical Bible Interpretation

Metaphysical Bible Interpretation of Exodus Chapter 35

Metaphysically Interpreting Exodus 35:1-3

35:1And Moses assembled all the congregation of the children of Israel, and said unto them, These are the words which Jehovah hath commanded, that ye should do them. 35:2Six days shall work be done; but on the seventh day there shall be to you a holy day, a sabbath of solemn rest to Jehovah: whosoever doeth any work therein shall be put to death.35:3Ye shall kindle no fire throughout your habitations upon the sabbath day.

Metaphysically Interpreting Exodus 35:4-19

35:4And Moses spake unto all the congregation of the children of Israel, saying, This is the thing which Jehovah commanded, saying, 35:5Take ye from among you an offering unto Jehovah; whosoever is of a willing heart, let him bring it, Jehovah's offering: gold, and silver, and brass, 35:6and blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine linen, and goats' hair, 35:7and rams' skins dyed red, and sealskins, and acacia wood, 35:8and oil for the light, and spices for the anointing oil, and for the sweet incense, 35:9and onyx stones, and stones to be set, for the ephod, and for the breastplate.

35:10And let every wise-hearted man among you come, and make all that Jehovah hath commanded: 35:11the tabernacle, its tent, and its covering, its clasps, and its boards, its bars, its pillars, and its sockets; 35:12the ark, and the staves thereof, the mercy-seat, and the veil of the screen; 35:13the table, and its staves, and all its vessels, and the showbread; 35:14the candlestick also for the light, and its vessels, and its lamps, and the oil for the light; 35:15and the altar of incense, and its staves, and the anointing oil, and the sweet incense, and the screen for the door, at the door of the tabernacle; 35:16the altar of burnt-offering, with its grating of brass, it staves, and all its vessels, the laver and its base; 35:17the hangings of the court, the pillars thereof, and their sockets, and the screen for the gate of the court; 35:18the pins of the tabernacle, and the pins of the court, and their cords; 35:19the finely wrought garments, for ministering in the holy place, the holy garments for Aaron the priest, and the garments of his sons, to minister in the priest's office.

January 27, 1946: Exodus 35:4-9

What has free will to do with the building of the enduring body? The enduring or eternal body cannot be built except as we willingly turn our thought to God and devote ourselves wholeheartedly to the work of expressing Truth in all that we think, say, or do. Only those who were “of a willing heart” could make an offering to help build the tabernacle.

Does the tabernacle represent the enduring body? No, it represents the temporal body, but this is to be changed into the eternal, spiritual body (the Temple).

Why are the “gifts” of the temporal or perishable body represented as precious? Because the functions of the body are enduring and every function has its spiritual counterpart. Even so-called physical gifts are precious and without price. A court of law may assess the damage done a person in the loss of an eye, but no money damage can compensate for such a loss.

Metaphysically Interpreting Exodus 35:20-29

35:20And all the congregation of the children of Israel departed from the presence of Moses. 35:21And they came, every one whose heart stirred him up, and every one whom his spirit made willing, and brought Jehovah's offering, for the work of the tent of meeting, and for all the service thereof, and for the holy garments. 35:22And they came, both men and women, as many as were willing-hearted, and brought brooches, and ear-rings, and signet-rings, and armlets, all jewels of gold; even every man that offered an offering of gold unto Jehovah. 35:23And every man, with whom was found blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine linen, and goats' hair, and rams' skins dyed red, and sealskins, brought them. 35:24Every one that did offer an offering of silver and brass brought Jehovah's offering; and every man, with whom was found acacia wood for any work of the service, brought it.35:25And all the women that were wise-hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, the blue, and the purple, the scarlet, and the fine linen. 35:26And all the women whose heart stirred them up in wisdom spun the goats' hair. 35:27And the rulers brought the onyx stones, and the stones to be set, for the ephod, and for the breastplate;35:28and the spice, and the oil; for the light, and for the anointing oil, and for the sweet incense. 35:29The children of Israel brought a freewill-offering unto Jehovah; every man and woman, whose heart made them willing to bring for all the work, which Jehovah had commanded to be made by Moses.
September 12, 1926: Exodus 35:20-29

What does the tabernacle in the wilderness represent to human consciousness? In its structure the tabernacle in the wilderness represents man’s fleshly, impermanent body. The furnishings of the tabernacle represent the enduring ideas that we are gathering in the mind, which eventually will become part of the eternal spiritual body.

Why do we interpret the exterior of the tabernacle in the wilderness as representing the body of flesh and the interior as representing the spirit? The outer structure of the tabernacle in the wilderness was to be of cloth and skins; but the altar, the laver, the candlesticks, the ark of the covenant, and all the inner utensils, were to be of gold and of silver and of precious woods. This means that the fleshly covering of the body is perishable, but that the central functions of the body are enduring. When the Lord commanded the building of this temporary structure, there was a promise of an imperishable one, even the body of Christ. [Transcriber's Note: Some unreadable words here were supplied from the next lesson of August 28, 1932: Exodus 35:21-29.]

What is the meaning of Jehovah’s directing, through Moses, the setting up of the tabernacle? The setting up of the tabernacle under divine guidance means the establishing of a new state of consciousness or of a new attitude of mind toward the character of the body. With the introduction of new ideas in mind, the body begins to be transformed in its cellular structure. Paul said that we are transformed by the renewing of the mind. We should remember to keep in mind the image of the perfect body. The tabernacle in the wilderness was built after the pattern that had been shown to Moses on the mount.

What is the first step to be taken in building the tabernacle? The first step to be taken in building the tabernacle is the giving of gifts. To build the tabernacle in the wilderness, a great variety of gifts were called for. Those who were too poor to give jewels, gold, silver, or bronze, were to give spices, oil, skins, or linen, or they could give their personal services. Those who gave offerings gave them willingly. We are here shown that we must give up the material ideas of value before we can build the spiritual temple. But back of material ideas is a substance which is converted into the new body. Nothing is lost in the divine economy.

Give the spiritual meaning of verses 22 and 23. The jewels of gold and of silver represent rich, enduring thoughts of wisdom and of substances. The fine linen symbolizes purity of thought and purpose; in Revelation 19:8 we are told that the fine linen in which the Lamb’s wife shall be arrayed is the righteous acts of the saints.

Explain verse 25: “And all the women that were wise-hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, the blue, and the purple, the scarlet, and the fine linen.” The word “women” symbolizes the soul, the feminine or love quality in man, and the significance here is that the ideals of purity, truth, power, and energy have been worked out in the soul.

August 28, 1932: Exodus 35:21-29

What does the tabernacle in the wilderness represent in human consciousness? In its structure the tabernacle in the wilderness represents man’s fleshly, impermanent body. The furnishings of the tabernacle represent the enduring ideas that we are gathering in the mind, which eventually will become part of the eternal spiritual body.

Give the spiritual meaning of verses 22 and 23. The jewels of gold represent rich, enduring thoughts of wisdom and substance. The fine linen symbolizes purity of thought and purpose. In Revelation 19:8 we are told that the fine linen in which the Lamb’s wife shall be arrayed is the righteous acts of the saints.

Explain the 25th verse: “And all the women that were wise-hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, the blue, and the purple, the scarlet, and the fine linen.” The word “women” symbolizes the soul, the feminine or love quality in man, and the significance here is that the ideals of purity, truth, power, and energy have become active in the soul.

Why do we interpret the exterior of the tabernacle in the wilderness as representing the body of flesh and its interior as representing Spirit? The outer structure of the tabernacle in the wilderness was to be of cloth and skins; but the altar, the laver, the candlesticks, the ark of the covenant, and all the inner utensils were to be of gold and silver and precious woods. This means that the fleshly covering of the body is perishable, but that the central functions of the body, the twelve powers of man are enduring. When the Lord commanded the building of this temporary structure, there was a promise of an imperishable one, even the Christ body.

What is the meaning of Jehovah’s directing, through Moses, the setting up of the tabernacle? The setting up of the tabernacle under divine guidance means the establishing of a new state of consciousness or a new attitude of mind toward the character of the body. With the introduction of new ideas into the mind, transformation of the cellular structure of the body is begun. Paul said that we are transformed by the renewing of the mind. We should keep in mind the image of the perfect body. The tabernacle in the wilderness was built after the pattern that had been shown to Moses on the mount.

What is the first step to be taken in building the tabernacle? The first step to be taken in building the tabernacle is the giving of gifts. To build the tabernacle in the wilderness, a great variety of gifts was called for. Those who were too poor to give jewels, gold, silver, or bronze were to give spices, oil, skins, or linen, or they could give their personal services. Those who gave offerings gave them willingly. We are here shown that we must give up the material ideas of value before we can build the spiritual temple. But back of material ideas is a substance which is converted into the new body. Nothing is lost in the divine economy.

January 27, 1946: Exodus 35:20-29

Does the setting up of the tabernacle have a special symbolical significance in connection with our journey up from sense to Spirit? It denotes the establishing of a new state of consciousness. We take our pattern from our conception of the divine, but our consciousness as well as our character and our body we make ourselves.

Is personal service of value in the building of the eternal body? When given freely and willingly it is of inestimable value. The spirit in which it is given determines whether it is the work of God or a mere expression of the personal or sense self. He who without love and in a grudging or defiant spirit sacrifices himself does so to no purpose or profit to himself.

Since all substance is at bottom divine, why should we give back to God what we have received? All substance belongs to the universal and must be returned to it. Unless we dedicate our substance to higher uses it is dissipated in sense expression and is lost to us. All that belongs to God must be put to God-like uses if it is to serve according to its nature and give the greatest return of which it is capable.

Does the soul give back in proportion to what it receives? Because the law of increase is exemplified by the soul, the latter transmutes its gifts into more precious forms by the alchemy of love and gives more bountifully than it receives. Woman represents the soul. “And all the women that were wise-hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, the blue, and the purple, the scarlet, and the fine linen.”

Is a cheerful giver the only acceptable one? In the spiritual realm, yes, for he gives himself with his gift and thus makes himself receptive to the return blessing for which the perfect equilibrium of divine law provides. The grudging giver does not obey the whole law and receives a meager compensating blessing.

July 9, 1950: Exodus 35:4-5, 21

Who can give effectually to Jehovah? Those who in their heart and spirit are willing to give can do so effectually. Those who give unwillingly or merely from a sense of obligation derive nothing from their contributions; rather they are impoverished by them.

November 25, 1951: Exodus 35:21-29

Did democratic principles underlie the building of the tabernacle? Yes, it was a labor of love by all the people; “every one whose heart stirred him up, and every one whom his spirit made willing ... And they came, both men and women, as many as were willing-hearted ... And all the women whose hearts stirred them up in wisdom ... The children of Israel brought a freewill offering unto Jehovah; every man and woman, whose heart made them willing to bring for all the work.”

Did everyone give equally? No, each gave according to his ability. “The rulers brought the onyx stones, and the stones to be set, for the ephod, and the breastplate” as well as the costly spices and oils. Others gave less costly gifts of linen, goats' skins, silver, brass, or wood, and many gave their work. We are to give what we have, for every gift is great in God’s sight, and important to Him.

Metaphysically Interpreting Exodus 35:30-35

35:30And Moses said unto the children of Israel, See, Jehovah hath called by name Bezalel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah. 35:31And he hath filled him with the Spirit of God, in wisdom, in understanding, and in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship; 35:32and to devise skilful works, to work in gold, and in silver, and in brass, 35:33and in cutting of stones for setting, and in carving of wood, to work in all manner of skilful workmanship. 35:34And he hath put in his heart that he may teach, both he, and Oholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. 35:35Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of workmanship, of the engraver, and of the skilful workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any workmanship, and of those that devise skilful works.

Transcribed by Lloyd Kinder on 02-03-2014