Proverbs 1 Metaphysical Bible Interpretation

Metaphysical Bible Interpretation of Proverbs Chapter 1

Metaphysically Interpreting Proverbs 1:1-7

1:1The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel:

1:2To know wisdom and instruction;
To discern the words of understanding;

1:3To receive instruction in wise dealing,
In righteousness and justice and equity;

1:4To give prudence to the simple,
To the young man knowledge and discretion:

1:5That the wise man may hear, and increase in learning;
And that the man of understanding may attain unto sound counsels:

1:6To understand a proverb, and a figure,
The words of the wise, and their dark sayings.

1:7The fear of Jehovah is the beginning of knowledge;
But the foolish despise wisdom and instruction.

Metaphysically Interpreting Proverbs 1:8-19

1:8My son, hear the instruction of thy father,
And forsake not the law of thy mother:

1:9For they shall be a chaplet of grace unto thy head,
And chains about thy neck.

1:10My son, if sinners entice thee,
Consent thou not.

1:11If they say, Come with us, Let us lay wait for blood;
Let us lurk privily for the innocent without cause;

1:12Let us swallow them up alive as Sheol,
And whole, as those that go down into the pit;

1:13We shall find all precious substance;
We shall fill our houses with spoil;

1:14Thou shalt cast thy lot among us;
We will all have one purse:

1:15My son, walk not thou in the way with them;
Refrain thy foot from their path:

1:16For their feet run to evil,
And they make haste to shed blood.

1:17For in vain is the net spread
In the sight of any bird:

1:18And these lay wait for their own blood;
They lurk privily for their own lives.

1:19So are the ways of every one that is greedy of gain;
It taketh away the life of the owners thereof.

October 25, 1896: Prov. 1:1-19

INTERPRETATION

The consciousness of Understanding comes into manifestation in two ways or through two channels, viz.: body and language. Truth is ever seeking expression through these two channels. In this lesson we consider Wisdom's expression through spoken language. If you have attained to this consciousness, your “speech will always be seasoned with salt.” Col. 4:6 "out of the abundance (of wisdom) of the heart the mouth will speak" its wisdom; your utterances will be from the wisdom consciousness; and therefore will be wise.

Education in early times, before the era of books, consisted in oral teaching, or training under a tutor, who presented his ideas in the form of trite sayings, epigrams, proverbs, parables and allegories, which embodied truth in the form most readily understood and remembered.

Plato, Socrates, Zeno, and Aristotle were brilliant examples of these early teachers; and their teaching approached the high standard of True Wisdom in proportion as they listened to the voice of Wisdom within.

This primitive mode of teaching gradually fell into disuse, with the advent of books, by which men were led into habits of mere intellectual reasoning. Intuitional thought brought men into intimate contact with Omniscience; while book-reading develops ratiocination, or pure intellection or cerebration. The tendency of this modern mode of education is to build up a wisdom not of the interior intuitional pattern, but of an exterior intellectual type, widely differing from True Wisdom.

1-4. To intellect the wisdom of the Solomon consciousness expresses itself in terms of spoken language, uttered for the purpose of conveying its "wisdom," "instruction," understanding and "discretion" to everyone who is meek enough to receive it.

5-6. For only the meek will hear and increase learning and be able to understand the deeper meanings of "the words of the wise," which are but "dark sayings" to the "simple," the "fools" who "despise wisdom." To these unregenerate the Bible is a book written in cipher, to which the Spirit gives the key to let the meek regenerate into the secret mysteries of celestial experiences.

7. "The fear of the Lord," which is but a Scripture name for meekness, "is the beginning of knowledge," the initiatory step into the consciousness of Wisdom; for the "secret of the Lord is with them that fear him"—the meek.

8. Intuition is the silent voice of Wisdom, speaking to the consciousness from its own Spiritual realm; and intellectual reason is the outward expression or "son" of Intuition; wherefore Intuition says to Intellect, "My son, hear the instruction of thy father, and forsake not the law of thy mother."

9. If Intellect is meek enough to hear the voice of Intuition, its thought and utterance will be so enriched thereby, that it will be "an ornament of grace to the head," and a royal badge of a gold "chain about its neck."

10-16. Intellect having through meekness learned Spiritual Wisdom of Intuition," cannot be enticed by the blandishments of evil thoughts—"sinners"—enlightened intellect cannot "walk in the way" of these "sinners," because it understands the falsity of that "way."

17. It is "in vain" that carnal thought essays to seduce us from our stronghold in Truth, while we have the full enlightenment of the consciousness of Understanding.

18. Because to wrong another is but to wrong oneself; our evil thoughts only hurt ourselves; they "lurk privily for their own lives."

19. "So is everyone." This is the law of Jesus Christ: "judge not that ye be not judged; for with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged." Every wicked thought which we hurl at our brother returns its condemnation upon our own head; it only proves, "the beam is in thine own eye." His mischief shall return upon his own head, and his violent dealing shall come down upon his own pate. " Psalms 7:16.

UNITY magazine.

July 27, 1947: Prov. 1:1-5

What is the first step in developing wisdom? The exercising of our perceptive faculties. As we develop perception we learn "to discern the words of understanding."

How do we do this? The obvious way is to submit ourselves to training under persons who already have understanding and perception. We can also train ourselves through meditation, prayer, and study.

How do we acquire the mental acuteness called "prudence" in this lesson? Mental acuteness is a product of wisdom, justice, judgment, and equity. We acquire it as we progress in these four quickened faculties.

Why are knowledge and discretion rare gifts in young people? Because young people generally give little heed to them. Although the faculties are available to everyone, the person who develops them becomes outstanding in comparison with those who fail in this regard.

August 3, 1947: Prov. 1:8-9

INTERPRETATION

What is the purpose of educating children and youth? To develop their Inner resources, thereby enabling them to meet and surmount the obstacles of life, and to train them to keep the divine law and thus express life in its fullness.

When should the education of the child begin? At the child's birth when the parents quietly but firmly establish the conditions that they consider best for the child and train it to adjust itself to them.

What training makes the most impression on the mind? That which is Inspired by love ("the Instruction of thy father … the law of thy mother"). This is especially true in cases in which the love of parents arouses a conscious response in the child.

What is the effect on a person's life, when he faithfully lives up to the conscientious training he received early in life? He develops a sense of balance and a beauty of character that he may not attain otherwise. "They shall be a chaplet of grace unto thy head, And chains about thy neck."

July 28, 1940: Prov. 1:7-10

What is it to fear Jehovah? This is to keep the law of one's being, doing that which is morally right, physically wholesome, and spiritually uplifting. The word fear as here used implies reverence rather than apprehension.

Who is the "son" referred to in the extracts from Proverbs that form part of today's lesson text? The son represents generic man, who is to become a son of God.

What common aim have the instruction of a father and the law of a mother? Both seek to strengthen the child's character so that he may keep the law of life in spite of any influences that may be brought to bear upon him from without.

August 6, 1944: Prov. 1:7-10

What is it to fear Jehovah? This is to keep the law of one's being, doing that which is morally right, physically wholesome, and spiritually uplifting. The word fear as here used implies reverence rather than apprehension.

Who is the "son" referred to in the extracts from Proverbs that form part of today's lesson text? The son represents generic man, who is to become a son of God.

What common aim have the instruction of a father and the law of a mother? Both seek to strengthen the child's character so that he may keep the law of life in spite of any influences that may be brought to bear upon him from without.

What is symbolized by "a chaplet of grace" and chains about the neck? Obedience to the law of life produces spiritual qualities that adorn character as certainly as physical ornaments adorn the body.

What is one of the essential requirements of self-discipline? A wholesome respect for the law of life.

Transcribed by Lloyd Kinder on 10-14-2013