II Timothy 1 Metaphysical Bible Interpretation

Metaphysical Bible Interpretation of II Timothy Chapter 1

Metaphysically Interpreting II Timothy 1:1-2

1:1Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus through the will of God, according to the promise of the life which is in Christ Jesus,
   1:2to Timothy, my beloved child: Grace, mercy, peace, from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord.

Metaphysically Interpreting II Timothy 1:3-18

1:3I thank God, whom I serve from my forefathers in a pure conscience, how unceasing is my remembrance of thee in my supplications, night and day 1:4longing to see thee, remembering thy tears, that I may be filled with joy; 1:5having been reminded of the unfeigned faith that is in thee; which dwelt first in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and, I am persuaded, in thee also. 1:6For which cause I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee through the laying on of my hands. 1:7For God gave us not a spirit of fearfulness; but of power and love and discipline.

1:8Be not ashamed therefore of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me his prisoner: but suffer hardship with the gospel according to the power of God; 1:9who saved us, and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before times eternal, 1:10but hath now been manifested by the appearing of our Saviour Christ Jesus, who abolished death, and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel, 1:11whereunto I was appointed a preacher, and an apostle, and a teacher. 1:12For which cause I suffer also these things: yet I am not ashamed; for I know him whom I have believed, and I am persuaded that he is able to guard that which I have committed unto him against that day. 1:13Hold the pattern of sound words which thou hast heard from me, in faith and love which is in Christ Jesus. 1:14That good thing which was committed unto thee guard through the Holy Spirit which dwelleth in us.

1:15This thou knowest, that all that are in Asia turned away from me; of whom are Phygelus and Hermogenes.1:16The Lord grant mercy unto the house of Onesiphorus: for he oft refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain; 1:17but, when he was in Rome, he sought me diligently, and found me 1:18(the Lord grant unto him to find mercy of the Lord in that day); and in how many things he ministered at Ephesus, thou knowest very well.

June 13, 1897: II Timothy 1:1-7

1. To be an “apostle” or one “sent out” by the Spirit to do the Spirit’s evangelizing work, One must have first received the Spirit's baptism, or “enduement with power from on high;” and this enduement is “the promise of the father” referred to in Acts 1:4, and here as “the promise of life in Jesus Christ.” Your apostleship must be “by the will of God,” in order to be efficient: that is, you must be “meek and lowly of heart;” you must in Gethsemane have laid down the “will of the flesh,” self-will, and have consented to do the father's will. “Not my will but Thy will” is the lesson to be learned in Gethsemane.

2. Paul calls Timothy, “my son,” in several places: “my son, whom I have begotten in bonds.” This implies that the individual, baptised of the Spirit, has a part to act in the regeneration of others; that the Spirit's begetting may he operative through the active faith of one baptized of Spirit, so that we become, “Spiritual fathers in Israel,” and such a soul regenerated through our instrumentality Scripturally is our Spiritual son. But before we can fulfill this high function in the Spiritual birth of another, we must ourselves have the consciousness of a baptismal enduement of the Holy Ghost. We must not ignore the mission and power of the Holy Ghost in our lives; for this is the irresistible Divine energy that is going to redeem the world. And because we have been born again, “not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible,” and have received the enduement of power, we are able to speak the word of the Spirit’s benediction of “grace, mercy and peace” to others, measuring out to them, according to the measure of grace we have received in our baptism.

3. Paul had, “with a pure conscience,” served the God of his forefathers, even when he persecuted Christians, he “verily thought be was doing God service.” Thus the “prudent man” is doing the best he knows until the regenerating power of the Holy Spirit reveals to him the higher things of the Spirit.

4-5. When our brother is “in tears” of sorrow and suffering, like Paul we must have constant “remembrance” of him, holding him “day and night” in Divine perfection, that we “may be filled with joy, in seeing him” in truth of Being. The realization that his true inheritance in Being is Divine perfection will bring the manifestation of perfection in external expression (“in thee also”).

6. We have constant heed to be often reminded, both we and our brother, that the “gifts” of the Spirit are eternally ours, brought into visible expression by the “laying on of hand” of our active, living faith.

7. For the Spirit's “gifts” are not “fear” but “power and love and a sound mind.”

– UNITY magazine.

September 23, 1923: II Timothy 1:1-6

Explain the metaphysical meaning of verse 6: “For which cause I put thee in remembrance that thou stir up the gift of God, which is in thee through the laying on of my hands.” The gift of God which we are to stir up is our innate spiritual ego, the image and likeness implanted in us in the beginning. This stirring up is accomplished by casting out all fear and affirming the power of the word (“laying on of my hands”), as explained in II Timothy 1:7: “For God gave us not a spirit of fearfulness; but of power and love and discipline.”

September 15, 1935: II Timothy 1:1-14

What is the significance, in this lesson of Timothy's mixed parentage? Timothy's father was a Greek (intellectual reasoning). His mother was “a Jewess that believed,” which signifies faith in God and love of Him. Timothy (worshiping God) therefore represents an idea that has its beginning in a union of the intellectual reasoning with the inner spiritual qualities of faith and love.

Are reason and faith incompatible? In the perfectly attuned mind reason and faith unite harmoniously. This union is seen in certain scientists of today who are firm believers in God.

Has the combination of faith and reason been commented upon by poets? The couplet, “Reason's voice and God's, Nature's and Duty's never are at odds” (John Greenleaf Whittier) recognizes the interaction of reason and faith.

To what did Paul refer when be admonished Timothy to stir up the gift of God that was in him? Evidently to Timothy's understanding of spiritual truth, by reason of which he was expected to be fearless in his work of expressing the Christ, and to be filled with the spirit of power and love and discipline.

Is understanding the result of the union of faith and will? Firm faith acting under the impulse of the inspired will (Paul) leads man to the understanding of Truth. “If any man willeth to do his will, he shall know of the teaching, whether it is of God.”

How does faith affect our outlook on life? Faith leads us to see that life in its fullness is available to us and that through the Christ power we may enter into its abundance.

What is “the testimony of our Lord” spoken of by Paul? The testimony of the Lord is the inner experience or conviction of Truth that comes to him who practices concentrating the full power of his thought on the things that transcend his present knowledge.

How can the Truth seeker employ the spirit of discipline to good advantage? The habit of concentrating or centering the thoughts on the contemplation of Truth requires discipline of a high order, for the mind during meditation is prone to wander instead of coming to a focus.

Should we try first of all to understand the material universe? Our first field of conquest is our own life, not the material universe, and our first work in self-development is the overcoming of fear.

What good thing is committed to every one in common? Life is the gift that all men share and it is their responsibility to guard it through the Holy Spirit.

June 18, 1939: II Timothy 1:1-6

How does Paul establish a high level of constructive thought in his second letter to Timothy? The salutation “Grace, mercy, peace, from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord” fixes the thought of both the reader and the writer of this letter on a high level.

What ground for thanksgiving is made manifest by the word of Truth? Paul (the word of Truth) thanks God for the presence of mind that causes him to support and reinforce Timothy (worship) by daily prayer. Presence of mind is always ground for thanksgiving.

What further thought for Timothy did Paul take in prayer? Paul remembered to pray that Timothy's mind and heart might be kept in untroubled peace (that his tears might be dried).

What does remembrance of another in prayer avail the one who prays? Concentrating in prayer causes the one praying to recall a multitude of related thoughts, thus giving him the satisfaction of praying “with the understanding” or whole mind.

What does the name Timothy mean and what does it symbolize? Timothy (worshiping God) symbolizes inspired reason (“his father was a Greek”) united with faith and zeal (his mother was “a Jewess that believed”).

What was Timothy's gift, and how could he stir it up? An understanding of the truth about life formed Timothy's gift. He stirred up this understanding by undertaking to apply it practically to those around him who needed his help or who could profit by it.

December 10, 1944: II Timothy 1:3-6

What “unfeigned faith” is inherent in those who follow the Christ? Faith in Divine Mind and in ourselves as its expression. As God joins parent and child in a bond that cannot be broken, so we are joined with Divine Mind in a union that cannot be denied, disproved, or annulled.

Is it easy for us to overlook our spiritual gifts? It is, because most of our time and attention are given to temporal duties and interests. We sometimes need to be reminded of the “gift of God” that is in us, to keep temporal interests from absorbing all our attention.

How can we stir up this gift? By meditating on the truth of life as it is in Divine Mind and attempting to give that truth expression in all that we do. Keeping the spiritual side of life in mind arouses in us the power and desire to express the best that is in us, and such expression increases as we continue to practice it.

October 28, 1945: II Timothy 1:1-6

What is the promise of the life which is in Christ Jesus? The promise is eternal life through unity of Spirit. “I in them, and thou in me, that they may be perfected into one.”

Of what social importance is faith? Faith is a spiritual quality innate in every individual, and connects its possessor with God through the I AM. Socially it makes all men one in the Christ consciousness.

How do we serve God “in a pure conscience”? A pure conscience (“void of offence toward God and men”) is an absolute essential, if we would truly serve God. God is not mocked, and one with a guilty conscience cannot serve Him with undivided loyalty. With a clear conscience our powers are undivided, and are much more effectual in doing our work.

What is “unfeigned faith”? It is sincere faith, which grows in us according as we keep our eye single to the good.

How do we “stir up the gift of God” that is in us? This we do by renewing our faith. Faith is renewed by giving concentrated thought, interest, and attention to the things of God.

September 26, 1948: II Timothy 1:3-6

Is childhood training in spiritual truth desirable? Yes. Every child should he trained in spiritual truth and taught to have reverence for eternal values, for this is his birthright. Life is wrapped in mystery, and Being transcends human understanding. The child is entitled to be made acquainted with the truth of this transcendence as soon as he begins to inquire into the nature of the world and of life. The ministry of Timothy illustrates the value of early childhood training in Truth.

How does a person's faith in the divine ideal affect his inner life? It gives him a “pure conscience,” allowing him to be at peace with himself. “I thank God, whom I serve from my forefathers in a pure conscience.” Paul had accepted without misgiving or questioning the faith in which he was reared, and his consciousness was untroubled by doubt of uncertainty. After becoming a Christian he still worshiped the same God through Jesus Christ, the risen Lord.

In what respect is the training of children in spiritual truth analogous to the cultivation of plants? Ideas and thoughts implanted in the mind of the child grow and develop as a plant grows and develops in soil, that is properly prepared for it. The same care, skill, and patience should be expended on the training of the child as on the cultivation of the plant. In the case of the child love should be added, for without it the development of the child is retarded.

What is the “gift of God” that can be “stirred up” in each of us? A clear understanding of the truth about life. We stir up or renew our understanding of a subject when we undertake to make it clear to others who wish to learn about it.

July 8, 1951: II Timothy 1:3-6

In this lesson what is represented by the disciple Timothy? Timothy, the son of “a Jewess that believed” and a Greek, represents inspired reason united with faith and zeal.

How does a person's faith in the divine ideal affect his inner life? It gives him a pure conscience, allowing him to be at peace with himself. “I thank God, whom I serve from my forefathers in a pure conscience.” Paul had accepted without misgiving or questioning the faith in which he was reared, and his consciousness was untroubled by doubt of uncertainty. After becoming a Christian he still worshiped the same God through Jesus Christ, the risen Lord.

In what respect is the training of children in spiritual truth analogous to the cultivation of plants? Ideas and thoughts implanted in the mind of the child grow and develop as a plant grows and develops in soil that is properly prepared for it. The same care, skill, and patience should be expended on the training of the child as on the cultivation of the plant. In the case of the child love should be added; for without it the development of the child is retarded, just as that of the plant is retarded by lack of sunlight.

What is the “gift of God” that can be “stirred up” in each of us? A clear understanding of the truth about life. We stir up or renew our understanding of a subject when we undertake to make it clear to others who wish to learn about it.

What work did Paul expect Timothy to do in Ephesus? He expected him to arouse in those to whom he ministered a desire to express the Christ.

Transcribed by Lloyd Kinder on 01-10-2014